I have a few insights about COVID-19 based on specialized training from my past (thank you Army), but I am no expert. Many great epidemiologists and virologists at the CDC, WHO, and elsewhere who are working to find answers. They are going to be the best source of information and advice because they have dedicated a lifetime to studying things like coronavirus. Their wisdom and experience will help them point everyone in the right direction.

Scientific research takes time and the answers cannot be rushed if we want the answers to be valid.

Promoting caution while we wait for answers is a better approach than throwing caution to the wind and charging into uncertainty. This has led many organizations and events to be canceled or postponed “out of an abundance of caution.” Organizations are changing the way they do business. People are adapting to a new approach in this time of uncertainty.

Unfortunately, extreme isolation is not going to work for every business model or every individual. Some things need to be done in person. Caution will be important during these interactions.

  • Consider staying home if you feel are sick.
  • Wear a mask if you are uncertain about your exposure. The mask is a tool to protect others from your germs, not for you to protect yourself from others.
  • Remember that good hygiene and handwashing are effective defenses during cold and flu season.

Security will also be important. As remote work increases, foundational security concerns like access control and multi-factor authentication will be critical to ensure the right people are connecting to systems and interacting with data from a remote computer that may not have the usual corporate protections in place.

God bless everyone affected directly and indirectly by this new flu and everything else out there.

Source: LinkedIn